Crafts Area Page



Crafts Banner

 

Paper Traditions

Papermaking is still one of New England’s traditional manufacturing industries, although not as widespread as in the past. Today, Massachusetts has 13 operating paper mills, including Crane Paper in Dalton, which makes all the paper used in the printing of US currency. Hand papermaking, however, is a relatively rare craft.

Paper is stable, pliable, and practical. Invented in China more than 2,000 years ago, paper remains a fundamental agent for transmitting knowledge (writing, printing), and for designing things (sketching, modeling).

This year the folk craft area features a variety of traditions that use paper as a medium for folding, cutting, shaping, illumination, marbling, designing, and play. Paper comes in many forms. You can see alum-coated paper used in marbling; colored tissue paper used in Mexican piñata making;  handmade, textured paper used in wet-fold origami; architectural paper used in making models; rolls of patterned wall paper used by professional paperhangers; and recycled notebook paper children have used for generations to make fortune tellers, spit balls, and paper airplanes.

Try your hand at manuscript illumination. Watch how magical patterns appear on a floating liquid surface and are manipulated to make marbled paper. Fold a cootie catcher. And learn where the phrase “beaten to a pulp” comes from, by riding bicycle-driven papermaking equipment.

Participating craft artists:
Michael LaFosse & Richard Alexander, origami and hand paper making
Jeannine Mosely, computational origami
Regina & Dan St. John, paper marbling
Susan Urban, wycinanki, Polish paper cut designs
Amy Fagin, illuminated manuscripts
Drew Matott & Margaret Mahan, hand paper making
Heidi L. Johnson, professional paper hanging
Russell A. Call, architectural drawing and model making
Eleanor Yeomans & Mary Bogue, children’s paper lore
Angelica Ortiz, Mexican piñata making

 



{Name}
{Craft}
{Name}
{Craft}
{Photo}
{Home_Town}
{Bio}



Foodways Banner

Stuffed Dough

Stuffed dough is often associated with comfort food, whether it's a snack, an appetizer, a dessert, or part of a main meal. These toothsome treats are found in many cultures, using ingredients that traditionally are locally available. Varieties of stuffed dough made in home kitchens in the Lowell area are part of the cultural heritage of this year's cooks with Chinese, Indian, Italian, Middle Eastern, and Polish roots.

The dough can be leavened or unleavened; stuffed with sweets or savories; formed into various shapes; and be baked, fried, boiled, or steamed. There's no such thing as leftovers where stuffed dough is served.  

2014 Foodways information coming soon....

Schedule (demonstrations at Foodways Tent, Lucy Larcom Park)

Saturday, July 26th
Presenter Recipe Culture Time
Gwen Ghareeb Noonan baklawa Middle Eastern 12:00 noon
Lucia DiDuca Italian sausage & veggie roll Italian 1:00
Yogesh Kumar samosas Indian 2:00
Dottie Naruszewicz Flanagan pierogi Polish 3:00
Max Gow dumplings Chinese 4:00
 
Sunday, July 27th
Presenter Recipe Culture Time
Gwen Ghareeb Noonan baklawa Middle Eastern 12:00 noon
Lucia DiDuca Italian sausage & veggie roll Italian 1:00
Yogesh Kumar samosas Indian 2:00
Dottie Naruszewicz Flanagan pierogi Polish 3:00
Max Gow dumplings Chinese 4:00


Updated 07/24/2014 7:49 AM

 

 
 
Donate
 
Volunteer
Volunteer
 
American Folk Festival
Montana Folk Festival
Green Power
Facebook